2 posts on Git

git commit -m "EVERYTHING"

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I was working on a project today, when I realized that I had forgotten to commit for days (local only repo). I switched to my terminal, spent at least five minutes trying to decide on the commit message before settling to the completely uninformative “Another commit”. Embarrassed with myself, I shared my frustration with twitter:

Immediately, I started getting a flood of suggestions of what that commit message could have been. Some of them were hilarious, some clever and some both. So, I decided I wouldn’t be selfish and I’d share them. Enjoy:

https://twitter.com/jo\_Osiah/status/187541784870666241


Easily keep gh-pages in sync with master

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I always loved Github’s ability to publish pages for a project and get the strain out of your server. However, every time I tried it, I struggled to keep the gh-pages branch up to date. Until I discovered the awesome git rebase.

Usually my github workflow is like this:

git add . git status // to see what changes are going to be commited git commit -m ‘Some descriptive commit message’ git push origin master

Now, when I use gh-pages, there are only a few more commands that I have to use after the above:

git checkout gh-pages // go to the gh-pages branch git rebase master // bring gh-pages up to date with master git push origin gh-pages // commit the changes git checkout master // return to the master branch

I know this is old news to some of you (I’m a github n00b, struggling with basic stuff, so my advice is probably for other n00bs), but if I had read this a few months ago, it would’ve saved me big hassles, so I’m writing it for the others out there that are like me a few months ago.

Now if only I find an easy way to automate this… :)