Categories
Original Thoughts

On ratings and meters

I always thought that the semantically appropriate way to represent a rating (e.g. a star rating) is a <meter> element. They essentially convey the same type of information, the star rating is just a different presentation.

An example of a star rating widget, from Amazon

However, trying to style a <meter> element to look like a star rating is …tricky at best. Not to mention that this approach won’t even work in Shadow trees (unless you include the CSS in every single shadow tree).

So, I set out to create a proper web component for star ratings. The first conundrum was, how does this relate to a <meter> element?

  • Option 1: Should it extend <meter> using builtin extends?
  • Option 2: Should it use a web component with a <meter> in Shadow DOM?
  • Option 3: Should it be an entirely separate web component that just uses a meter ARIA Role and related ARIA attributes?
Categories
Articles

What is the best way to mark up an exclusive button group?

A few days ago I asked Twitter a seemingly simple question (I meant aria-pressed, not aria-selected but Twitter doesn’t allow edits…):

For background, I was implementing a web component for an app I’m working on at work and I was getting into some pretty weird rabbit holes with my approach of generating radios and labels.

Unsurprisingly, most people thought the best solution is radio buttons and labels. After all, it works without CSS, right? Progressive enhancement and everything?

That’s what I thought too. I had contorted my component to generate labels and radios in the Shadow DOM from buttons in the light DOM, which resulted in awkward code and awkward CSS, but I felt I was fighting the good fight and doing the best thing for accessibility.

All this was challenged when the actual accessibility expert, Léonie Watson chimed in. For those of you who don’t know her, she is pretty much the expert when it comes to web accessibility and standards. She is also visually impaired herself, giving her a firsthand experience many other a11y aficionados lack. Her recommendation was contrary to what most others were saying:

She went on to make the point that if a design looks like buttons, it should act like buttons, otherwise there are mismatched expectations and poor UX for AT users:

In case you were wondering if state would be equally noticeable with aria-pressed and buttons, it is:

And some advice on grouping:

In theory doing this in Shadow DOM and/or using ElementInternals implicit roles should be fine, though in practice we’ve had some trouble with that.

Today I posted my attempt to implement what we’ve discussed in a <button-group> component, which restarted the discussion.

Its implementation is right here if you want to improve it further! And make sure to check out the actual Twitter thread, as there is a lot of good stuff I couldn’t include in this!

Edit: Léonie wrote a blog post too, Perceived affordances and the functionality mismatch. It’s a great read.

Categories
Original Personal Releases

On Yak Shaving and <md-block>, a new HTML element for Markdown

This week has been Yak Shaving Galore. It went a bit like this:

  1. I’ve been working on a web component that I need for the project I’m working on. More on that later, but let’s call it <x-foo> for now.
  2. Of course that needs to be developed as a separate reusable library and released as a separate open source project. No, this is not the titular component, this was only level 1 of my multi-level yak shaving… 🤦🏽‍♀️
  3. I wanted to showcase various usage examples of that component in its page, so I made another component for these demos: <x-foo-live>. This demo component would have markup with editable parts on one side and the live rendering on the other side.
  4. I wanted the editable parts to autosize as you type. Hey, I’ve written a library for that in the past, it’s called Stretchy!
  5. But Stretchy was not written in ESM, nor did it support Shadow DOM. I must rewrite Stretchy in ESM and support Shadow DOM first! Surely it won’t take more than a half hour, it’s a tiny library.
  6. (It took more than a half hour)
  7. Ok, now I have a nice lil’ module, but I also need to export IIFE as well, so that it’s compatible with Stretchy v1. Let’s switch to Rollup and npm scripts and ditch Gulp.
  8. Oh look, Stretchy’s CSS is still written in Sass, even though it doesn’t really need it now. Let’s rewrite it to use CSS variables, use PostCSS for nesting, and use conic-gradient() instead of inline SVG data URIs.
  9. Ok, Stretchy v2 is ready, now I need to update its docs. Oooh, it doesn’t have a README? I should add one. But I don’t want to duplicate content between the page and the README. Hmmm, if only…
  10. I know! I’ll make a web component for rendering both inline and remote Markdown! I have an unfinished one lying around somewhere, surely it won’t take more than a couple hours to finish it?
  11. (It took almost a day, two with docs, demos etc)
  12. Done! Here it is! https://md-block.verou.me
  13. Great! Now I can update Stretchy’s docs and release its v2
  14. Great! Now I can use Stretchy in my <x-foo-live> component demoing my <x-foo> component and be back to only one level of yak shaving!
  15. Wow, it’s already Friday afternoon?! 🤦🏽‍♀️😂

Hopefully you find <md-block> useful! Enjoy!

Categories
Rants Thoughts

The failed promise of Web Components

Web Components had so much potential to empower HTML to do more, and make web development more accessible to non-programmers and easier for programmers. Remember how exciting it was every time we got new shiny HTML elements that actually do stuff? Remember how exciting it was to be able to do sliders, color pickers, dialogs, disclosure widgets straight in the HTML, without having to include any widget libraries?

The promise of Web Components was that we’d get this convenience, but for a much wider range of HTML elements, developed much faster, as nobody needs to wait for the full spec + implementation process. We’d just include a script, and boom, we have more elements at our disposal!

Or, that was the idea. Somewhere along the way, the space got flooded by JS frameworks aficionados, who revel in complex APIs, overengineered build processes and dependency graphs that look like the roots of a banyan tree.

This is what the roots of a Banyan tree look like. Photo by David Stanley on Flickr (CC-BY).