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Original Tips

The -​-var: ; hack to toggle multiple values with one custom property

What if I told you you could use a single property value to turn multiple different values on and off across multiple different properties and even across multiple CSS rules?

What if I told you you could turn this flat button into a glossy skeuomorphic button by just tweaking one custom property --is-raised, and that would set its border, background image, box and text shadows in one fell swoop?

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Articles Original

The Cicada Principle, revisited with CSS variables

Many of today’s web crafters were not writing CSS at the time Alex Walker’s landmark article The Cicada Principle and Why it Matters to Web Designers was published in 2011. Last I heard of it was in 2016, when it was used in conjunction with blend modes to pseudo-randomize backgrounds even further.

So what is the Cicada Principle and how does it relate to web design in a nutshell? It boils down to: when using repeating elements (tiled backgrounds, different effects on multiple elements etc), using prime numbers for the size of the repeating unit maximizes the appearance of organic randomness. Note that this only works when the parameters you set are independent.

When I recently redesigned my blog, I ended up using a variation of the Cicada principle to pseudo-randomize the angles of code snippets. I didn’t think much of it until I saw this tweet:

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Tips Tutorials

Hybrid positioning with CSS variables and max()

Notice how the navigation on the left behaves wrt scrolling: It’s like absolute at first that becomes fixed once the header scrolls out of the viewport.

One of my side projects these days is a color space agnostic color conversion & manipulation library, which I’m developing together with my husband, Chris Lilley (you can see a sneak peek of its docs above). He brings his color science expertise to the table, and I bring my JS & API design experience, so it’s a great match and I’m really excited about it! (if you’re serious about color and you’re building a tool or demo that would benefit from it contact me, we need as much early feedback on the API as we can get! )

For the documentation, I wanted to have the page navigation on the side (when there is enough space), right under the header when scrolled all the way to the top, but I wanted it to scroll with the page (as if it was absolutely positioned) until the header is out of view, and then stay at the top for the rest of the scrolling (as if it used fixed positioning).

Categories
Original Tips

Autoprefixing, with CSS variables!

Recently, when I was making the minisite for markapp.io, I realized a neat trick one can do with CSS variables, precisely due to their dynamic nature. Let’s say you want to use a property that has multiple versions: an unprefixed one and one or more prefixed ones. In this example we are going to use clip-path, which currently needs both an unprefixed version and a -webkit- prefixed one, however the technique works for any property and any number of prefixes or different property names, as long as the value is the same across all variations of the property name.

The first part is to define a --clip-path property on every element with a value of initial. This prevents the property from being inherited every time it’s used, and since the * has zero specificity, any declaration that uses --clip-path can override it. Then you define all variations of the property name with var(--clip-path) as their value:

* {
	--clip-path: initial;
	-webkit-clip-path: var(--clip-path);
	clip-path: var(--clip-path);
}

Then, every time we need clip-path, we use –clip-path instead and it just works:

header {
	--clip-path: polygon(0% 0%, 100% 0%, 100% calc(100% - 2.5em), 0% 100%);
}

Even !important should work, because it affects the cascading of CSS variables. Furthermore, if for some reason you want to explicitly set -webkit-clip-path, you can do that too, again because * has zero specificity. The main downside to this is that it limits browser support to the intersection of the support for the feature you are using and support for CSS Variables. However, all browsers except Edge support CSS variables, and Edge is working on it. I can’t see any other downsides to it (except having to use a different property name obvs), but if you do, let me know in the comments!

I think there’s still a lot to be discovered about cool uses of CSS variables. I wonder if there exists a variation of this technique to produce custom longhands, e.g. breaking box-shadow into --box-shadow-x, --box-shadow-y etc, but I can’t think of anything yet. Can you? 😉