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Incrementable length values in text fields

I always loved that Firebug and Dragonfly feature that allows you to increment or decrement a <length> value by pressing the up and down keyboard arrows when the caret is over it. I wished my Front Trends slides supported it in the editable examples, it would make presenting so much easier. So, I decided to implement the functionality, to use it in my next talk.

If you still have no idea what I’m talking about, you can see a demo here:
View demo

You may configure it so that it only does that when modifiers (alt, ctrl and/or shift) are used by providing a second argument to the constructor and/or change the units supported by filling in the third argument. However, bear in mind that holding down the Shift key will make it increment by Β±10 instead of Β±1 and that’s not configurable (it would add too much unneeded complexity, I’m not even sure whether it’s a good idea to make the other thing configurable either).

You may download it or fork it from it’s Github repo.

And if you feel creative, you may improve it by fixing an Opera bug I gave up on: When the down arrow is pressed, the caret moves to the end of the string, despite the code telling it not to.

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Original Personal Releases

My FT2010 slides and CSSS: My presentation framework

Screenshot of the first slideAbout a week ago, I was in Warsaw, Poland to give my first talk at a big conference, Front Trends 2010. As every first-time speaker, I was extremely nervous and worried that everything would go bad. That my talk would be boring or too basic or that I would just freeze at stage, unable to say a word. It was a 2-hour talk with a break in between, so I was also terrified that nobody would show up the second hour.

Contrary to my fears and insecurities, it went better than I could have ever hoped. The feedback on twitter and in general was enthusiastic! There wasn’t a single negative comment. Even people I look up to, like Tantek Γ‡elik, PPK, Jake Archibald or Robert Nyman had something good to say! And instead of nobody showing up the second hour, the audience almost doubled!

At this point, I would like to thank Christian Heilmann for helping me become less nervous before my talk by going through all my slides with me and offering his invaluable advice for every part (I forgot to follow most of it, but it really helped in my attitude). I can’t thank you enough Christian!

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Original Releases

CSS3 structural pseudo-class selector tester

I was doing some research today about how people explain the CSS3 structural* pseudo classes and I stumbled upon this demo by CSS tricks: http://css-tricks.com/examples/nth-child-tester/

I thought the idea is awesome, but lacks a few features:

  • It doesn’t use the native browser algorithm for selecting the elements. Granted, it’s not that tough to code your own properly, but I trust a browser implementation more (IE doesn’t support these altogether, so it’s out of the question anyway).
  • Doesn’t allow you to test for nth-last-child, nth-of-type, nth-last-of-type (and especially the last two are a lot harder to understand for most people)
  • Doesn’t allow you to add/remove list items to see the effects of the selector with different numbers of elements (especially needed if nth-last-child, nth-of-type, nth-last-of-type were involved)

So, I decided to code my own. It allows you to test for all 4 nth-something selectors, supports adding/removing elements (the selected elements update instantly) and uses the native browser implementation to select them (so it won’t work on IE and old browsers).

Enjoy: CSS3 structural pseudo-class selector tester πŸ™‚

*Yes, :root and :empty also belong to those, but are rarely used. All other structural pseudoclasses are actually shortcuts to some particular case of the aforementioned 4 πŸ™‚

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A CSS3 learning(?) tool

In case anyone is interested, this is my take on the “challenge” that Brad Neuberg posted today on Ajaxian. It needs more properties, but it’s very easy to extend. I guess I should also add CSS3 values (RGBA/HSL(A) colors, CSS gradients etc) but oh well, I’m currently in a hurry. I will, if anyone actually finds it useful (?).

It didn’t prove much of a challenge actually and I honestly doubt it’s educational value (actually it’s value in general), but it was an interesting thing to do while drinking my first coffee in the morning — I really enjoyed writing it πŸ™‚

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Cross-browser imageless linear gradients v2

A while ago, I posted a script of mine for creating 2-color cross-browser imageless linear gradients. As I stated there, I needed them for a color picker I have to create. And even though 2-color gradients are sufficient for most components, in most color spaces, I had forgotten an important one: Hue. You can’t represent Hue with a 2-color gradient! So, I had to revise the script, and make it able to produce linear gradients of more than 2 colors. Furthermore, I needed to be able to specify a fully transparent color as one of the gradient colors, in order to create the photoshop-like 2d plane used by the picker (and no, a static image background like the one used in most JS color pickers wouldn’t suffice, for reasons irrelevant with this post). I hereby present you Cross-browser, imageless, linear gradients v2!

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Bulletproof, cross-browser RGBA backgrounds, today

UPDATE: New version

First of all, happy Valentine’s day for yersterday. πŸ™‚ This is the second part of my “Using CSS3 today” series. This article discusses current RGBA browser support and ways to use RGBA backgrounds in non-supporting browsers. Bonus gift: A PHP script of mine that creates fallback 1-pixel images on the fly that allow you to easily utilize RGBA backgrounds in any browser that can support png transparency. In addition, the images created are forced to be cached by the client and they are saved on the server’s hard drive for higher performance.