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Releases Speaking

Introducing Rety: live coding, without the stress

I recently spoke at CSS Day in Amsterdam. It was only my second f2f talk after the pandemic. It went down really well, both in person, and recently that the video was released:

Here is a sample of tweets about it that made me particularly warm and fuzzy inside:

There’s a lot more where these came from too.

This was not just my second post-pandemic talk, but my first talk using Rety, which is what this post is about.

As you may know, I love live coding as a teaching tool, and over the years it has become part of my trademark speaking style.

When combined with some kind of interactive preview, it allows the speaker to demonstrate not only the final state of a coding snippet, but also how you get there, and what the intermediate results are. Live coding is to programming what a blackboard is to math or physics.

But it does create a unique challenge: My live coded slides don’t make sense without me. This may be acceptable for a conference talk, which is usually recorded, but not in other contexts, such as teaching a university course, where all instructors need to be able to teach all lectures, and students need to be able to quickly refer to examples shown.

Back in the fall of 2021, when we were preparing for the second iteration of our course, Design for the Web: Languages and User Interfaces, this came up as a pressing issue. The current state of the course required me to be there to teach my lectures, and this may well be the last year I teach it, since I’m finishing up my PhD soon.

I didn’t want to completely remove live coding from my slides, as I truly believe it is the perfect implementation of the “show, don’t tell” teaching adage for certain things, so I thought instead: what if I could record my live coding, and make it replayable?

Doing so manually seemed like cruel and unusual punishment. And thus, Rety was born (pronounced like the “rety” in “retype”).

While originally the plan was for me to still live code, and have the Rety functionality there for students and future instructors, I ended up using it during my own lectures as well, as I concluded that a well crafted Rety script was strictly superior to me doing the live coding:

  • Same progressive development as a live demo
  • It still affords unplanned demonstrations (e.g. to answer a question), since Rety still works with the same editors, and I could always pause it and take over if needed.
  • I could record myself and edit the script to maximize education value and minimize typos, delays, fumbling etc.
  • People can consume typed text far faster than people can type text. This is why most video tutorials speed up the typing. With Rety, typing speed is adjustable, and doesn’t need to match mine.

After test driving it for our course the entire spring 2022 semester, it went through the ultimate test in June 2022: I used it for my CSSDay conference talk. You can watch the talk here (first live demo at 7:15).

Right now Rety is just a set of two classes: Recorder and Replayer, which are used entirely independently. The exact UI is left up to the Rety user. E.g. to use it in my slides, I integrated it with the Live Demo plugin of Inspire.js (it is automatically included if a <script class="demo-script" type="application/json"> is found in a live demo slide).

The library could use more docs and some tests and I have doubts about the API, but I figured I should release it it earlier rather than later (it’s already been sitting in a repo for 7 months). After all, what best time to release it than when the first Rety talk is still making the rounds?

My vision is to ultimately evolve and standardize the Rety script format, so that it can be used to describe a coding interaction across a variety of tools. There are so many possibilities!

  • Wouldn’t it be cool if CodePen and similar playgrounds supported embedding a Rety script into a pen?
  • What if you could store Rety scripts in a repo and editors like VS Code recognized them and let you replay them?

Enjoy: Rety

Categories
Original Releases

Releasing Color.js: A library that takes color seriously

Related: Chris’ blog post for the release of Color.js

This post has been long overdue: Chris and I started working on Color.js in 2020, over 2 years ago! It was shortly after I had finished the Color lecture for the class I was teaching at MIT and I was appalled by the lack of color libraries that did the things I needed for the demos in my slides. I asked Chris, “Hey, what if we make a Color library? You will bring your Color Science knowledge and I will bring my JS and API design knowledge. Wouldn’t this be the coolest color library ever?”. There was also a fair bit of discussion in the CSS WG about a native Color object for the Web Platform, and we needed to play around with JS for a while before we could work on an API that would be baked into browsers.

We had a prototype ready in a few months and presented it to the CSS WG. People loved it and some started using it despite it not being “officially” released. There was even a library that used Color.js as a dependency!

Once we got some experience from this usage, we worked on a draft specification for a Color API for the Web. In July 2021 we presented it again in a CSS WG Color breakout and everyone agreed to incubate it in WICG, where it lives now.

Why can’t we just standardize the API in Color.js? While one is influenced by the other, a Web Platform API has different constraints and needs to follow more restricted design principles compared to a JS library, which can be more flexible. E.g. exotic properties (things like color.lch.l) are very common in JS libraries, but are now considered an antipattern in Web Platform APIs.

Work on Color.js as well as the Color API continued, on and off as time permitted, but no release. There were always things to do and bugs to fix before more eyes would look at it. Because eyes were looking at it anyway, we even slapped a big fat warning on the homepage:

Eventually a few days ago, I discovered that the Color.js package we had published on npm somehow has over 6000 downloads per week, nearly all of them direct. I would not bat an eyelid at those numbers if we had released Color.js into the wild, but for a library we actively avoided mentioning to anyone outside of standards groups, it was rather odd.

How did this happen? Maybe it was the HTTP 203 episode that mentioned it in passing? Regardless, it gave us hope that it’s filling a very real need in the pretty crowded space of color manipulation libraries and it gave us a push to finally get it out there.

So here we are, releasing Color.js into the wild. So what’s cool about it?

  • Completely color space agnostic, each Color object just has a reference to a color space, a list of coordinates,, and optionally an alpha.
  • Supports a large variety of color spaces including all color spaces from CSS Color 4, as well as the unofficial CSS Color HDR draft.
  • Supports interpolation as defined in CSS Color 4
  • Doesn’t skimp on color science: does actual gamut mapping instead of naïve clipping, and actual chromatic adaptation when converting between color spaces with different white points.
  • Multiple DeltaE methods for calculating color difference (2000, CMC, 76, Jz, OK etc)
  • The library itself is written to be very modular and ESM-first (with CJS and IIFE bundles) and provides a tree-shakeable API as well.

Enjoy: Color.js

There is also an entire (buggy, but usable) script in the website for realtime editable color demos that we call “Color Notebook”. It looks like this:

And you can create and share your own documents with live Color.js demos. You log in with GitHub and the app saves in GitHub Gists.

Color spaces presently supported by Color.js
Categories
Original Personal Releases

On Yak Shaving and <md-block>, a new HTML element for Markdown

This week has been Yak Shaving Galore. It went a bit like this:

  1. I’ve been working on a web component that I need for the project I’m working on. More on that later, but let’s call it <x-foo> for now.
  2. Of course that needs to be developed as a separate reusable library and released as a separate open source project. No, this is not the titular component, this was only level 1 of my multi-level yak shaving… 🤦🏽‍♀️
  3. I wanted to showcase various usage examples of that component in its page, so I made another component for these demos: <x-foo-live>. This demo component would have markup with editable parts on one side and the live rendering on the other side.
  4. I wanted the editable parts to autosize as you type. Hey, I’ve written a library for that in the past, it’s called Stretchy!
  5. But Stretchy was not written in ESM, nor did it support Shadow DOM. I must rewrite Stretchy in ESM and support Shadow DOM first! Surely it won’t take more than a half hour, it’s a tiny library.
  6. (It took more than a half hour)
  7. Ok, now I have a nice lil’ module, but I also need to export IIFE as well, so that it’s compatible with Stretchy v1. Let’s switch to Rollup and npm scripts and ditch Gulp.
  8. Oh look, Stretchy’s CSS is still written in Sass, even though it doesn’t really need it now. Let’s rewrite it to use CSS variables, use PostCSS for nesting, and use conic-gradient() instead of inline SVG data URIs.
  9. Ok, Stretchy v2 is ready, now I need to update its docs. Oooh, it doesn’t have a README? I should add one. But I don’t want to duplicate content between the page and the README. Hmmm, if only…
  10. I know! I’ll make a web component for rendering both inline and remote Markdown! I have an unfinished one lying around somewhere, surely it won’t take more than a couple hours to finish it?
  11. (It took almost a day, two with docs, demos etc)
  12. Done! Here it is! https://md-block.verou.me
  13. Great! Now I can update Stretchy’s docs and release its v2
  14. Great! Now I can use Stretchy in my <x-foo-live> component demoing my <x-foo> component and be back to only one level of yak shaving!
  15. Wow, it’s already Friday afternoon?! 🤦🏽‍♀️😂

Hopefully you find <md-block> useful! Enjoy!

Categories
Original Releases

Parsel: A tiny, permissive CSS selector parser

I’ve posted before about my work for the Web Almanac this year. To make it easier to calculate the stats about CSS selectors, we looked to use an existing selector parser, but most were too big and/or had dependencies or didn’t account for all selectors we wanted to parse, and we’d need to write our own walk and specificity methods anyway. So I did what I usually do in these cases: I wrote my own!

You can find it here: https://projects.verou.me/parsel/

Categories
Original Releases

Releasing MaVoice: A free app to vote on repo issues

First off, some news: I agreed to be this year’s CSS content lead for the Web Almanac! One of the first things to do is to flesh out what statistics we should study to answer the question “What is the state of CSS in 2020?”. You can see last year’s chapter to get an idea of what kind of statistics could help answer that question.

Of course, my first thought was “We should involve the community! People might have great ideas of statistics we could study!”. But what should we use to vote on ideas and make them rise to the top?

Categories
Articles CSS WG Original Releases

LCH colors in CSS: what, why, and how?

I was always interested in color science. In 2014, I gave a talk about CSS Color 4 at various conferences around the world called “The Chroma Zone”. Even before that, in 2009, I wrote a color picker that used a hidden Java applet to support ICC color profiles to do CMYK properly, a first on the Web at the time (to my knowledge). I never released it, but it sparked this angry rant.

Color is also how I originally met my now husband, Chris Lilley: In my first CSS WG meeting in 2012, he approached me to ask a question about CSS and Greek, and once he introduced himself I said “You’re Chris Lilley, the color expert?!? I have questions for you!”. I later discovered that he had done even more cool things (he was a co-author of PNG and started SVG 🤯), but at the time, I only knew of him as “the W3C color expert”, that’s how much into color I was (I got my color questions answered much later, in 2015 that we actually got together).

My interest in color science was renewed in 2019, after I became co-editor of CSS Color 5, with the goal of fleshing out my color modification proposal, which aims to allow arbitrary tweaking of color channels to create color variations, and combine it with Una’s color modification proposal. LCH colors in CSS is something I’m very excited about, and I strongly believe designers would be outraged we don’t have them yet if they knew more about them.

Categories
Articles Releases

Refresh CSS Bookmarklet v2

Almost 11 years ago, Paul Irish posted this brilliant bookmarklet to refresh all stylesheets on the current page. Despite the amount of tools, plugins, servers to live reload that have been released over the years, I’ve always kept coming back to it. It’s incredibly elegant in its simplicity. It works everywhere: locally or remotely, on any domain and protocol. No need to set up anything, no need to alter my process in any way, no need to use a specific local server or tool. It quietly just accepts your preferences and workflow instead of trying to change them. Sure, it doesn’t automatically detect changes and reload, but in most cases, I don’t want it to.

I’ve been using this almost daily for a decade and there’s always been one thing that bothered me: It doesn’t work with iframes. If the stylesheet you’re editing is inside an iframe, tough luck. If you can open the frame in a new tab, that works, but often that’s nontrivial (e.g. the frame is dynamically generated). After dealing with this issue today once more, I thought “this is just a few lines of JS, why not fix it?”.

The first step was to get Paul’s code in a readable format, since the bookmarklet is heavily minified:

(function() {
	var links = document.getElementsByTagName('link');
	for (var i = 0; i < links.length; i++) {
		var link = links[i];
		if (link.rel.toLowerCase().match(/stylesheet/) && link.href) {
			var href = link.href.replace(/(&|%5C?)forceReload=\d+/, '');
			link.href = href + (href.match(/\?/) ? '&' : '?') + 'forceReload=' + (new Date().valueOf())
		}
	}
})()

Once I did that, it became obvious to me that this could be shortened a lot; the last 10 years have been wonderful for JS evolution!

(()=>{
	for (let link of Array.from(document.querySelectorAll("link[rel=stylesheet][href]"))) {
		var href = new URL(link.href, location);
		href.searchParams.set("forceReload", Date.now());
		link.href = href;
	}
})()

Sure, this reduces browser support a bit (most notably it excludes IE11), but since this is a local development tool, that’s not such a big problem.

Now, let’s extend this to support iframes as well:

{
	let $$ = (selector, root = document) => Array.from(root.querySelectorAll(selector));
	
	let refresh = (document) => {
		for (let link of $$("link[rel=stylesheet][href]", document)) {
			let href = new URL(link.href);
			href.searchParams.set("forceReload", Date.now());
			link.href = href;
		}

		for (let iframe of $$("iframe", document)) {
			iframe.contentDocument && refresh(iframe.contentDocument);
		}
	}

	refresh();
}

That’s it! Do keep in mind that this will not work with cross-origin iframes, but then again, you probably don’t expect it to in that case.

Now all we need to do to turn it into a bookmarklet is to prepend it with javascript: and minify the code. Here you go:

Refresh CSS

Hope this is useful to someone else as well 🙂
Any improvements are always welcome!

Credits

  • Paul Irish, for the original bookmarklet
  • Maurício Kishi, for making the iframe traversal recursive (comment)
Categories
Original Releases

Introducing Mavo: Create web apps entirely by writing HTML!

Today I finally released the project I’ve been working on for the last two years at MIT CSAIL: An HTML-based language for creating (many kinds of) web applications without programming or a server backend. It’s named Mavo after my late mother (Maria Verou), and is Open Source of course (yes, getting paid to work on open source is exactly as fun as it sounds).

It was the scariest release of my life, and have been postponing it for months. I kept feeling Mavo was not quite there yet, maybe I should add this one feature first, oh and this other one, oh and we can’t release without this one, surely! Eventually I realized that what I was doing had more to do with postponing the anxiety and less to do with Mavo reaching a stage where it can be released. After all, “if you’re not at least a bit embarrassed by what you release, you waited too long”, right?

The infamous Ship It Squrrel

So, there it is, I hope you find it useful. Read the post on Smashing Magazine or just head straight to mavo.io, read the docs, and play with the demos!

And do let me know what you make with it, no matter how small and trivial you may think it is, I would love to see it!

Categories
Releases

Duoload: Simplest website load comparison tool, ever

Today I needed a quick tool to compare the loading progression (not just loading time, but also incremental rendering) of two websites, one remote and one in my localhost. Just have them side by side and see how they load relative to each other. Maybe even record the result on video and study it afterwards. That’s all. No special features, no analysis, no stats.

So I did what I always do when I need help finding a tool, I asked Twitter:

Most suggested complicated tools, some non-free and most unlikely to work on local URLs. I thought damn, what I need is a very simple thing! I could code this in 5 minutes! So I did and here it is, in case someone else finds it useful! The (minuscule amount of) code is of course on Github.

Duoload

Of course it goes without saying that this is probably a bit inaccurate. Do not use it for mission-critical performance comparisons.

Credits for the name Duoload to Chris Lilley who came up with it in the 1 minute deadline I gave him 😛

Categories
Original Releases

Introducing Multirange: A tiny polyfill for HTML5.1 two-handle sliders

multirangeAs part of my preparation for my talk at CSSDay HTML Special, I was perusing the most recent HTML specs (WHATWG Living Standard, W3C HTML 5.1) to see what undiscovered gems lay there. It turns out that HTML sliders have a lot of cool features specced that aren’t very well implemented:

  • Ticks that snap via the list attribute and the <datalist> element. This is fairly decently implemented, except labelled ticks, which is not supported anywhere.
  • Vertical sliders when height > width, implemented nowhere (instead, browsers employ proprietary ways for making sliders vertical: An orient=vertical attribute in Gecko, -webkit-appearance: slider-vertical; in WebKit/Blink and writing-mode: bt-lr; in IE/Edge). Good ol’ rotate transforms work too, but have the usual problems, such as layout not being affected by the transform.
  • Two-handle sliders for ranges, via the multiple attribute.

I made a quick testcase for all three, and to my disappointment (but not to my surprise), support was extremely poor. I was most excited about the last one, since I’ve been wanting range sliders in HTML for a long time. Sadly, there are no implementations. But hey, what if I could create a polyfill by cleverly overlaying two sliders? Would it be possible? I started experimenting in JSBin last night, just for the lolz, then soon realized this could actually work and started a GitHub repo. Since CSS variables are now supported almost everywhere, I’ve had a lot of fun using them. Sure, I could get broader support without them, but the code is much simpler, more elegant and customizable now. I also originally started with a Bliss dependency, but realized it wasn’t worth it for such a tiny script.

So, enjoy, and contribute!

Multirange