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Quicker Storify export

If you’ve used Storify, you probably know by now it’s closing down soon. They have an FAQ up to help people with the transition which explains that to export your content you need to…

  1. Log in to Storify at www.storify.com.
  2. Mouse over the story that contains content you would like to export and select “View.”
  3. Click on the ellipses icon and select “Export.”
  4. Choose your preferred format for download.
  5. To save your content and linked assets in HTML, select – File > Save as > Web Page, Complete. To export your content to PDF, select Export to HTML > File > Print > Save as PDF.
  6. Repeat the process for each story whose content you would like to preserve.

So I started doing that. I wasn’t sure if JSON or HTML would be more useful to me, so I was exporting both. It was painful. Each export required 3 page loads, and they were slow. After 5 stories, I started wondering if there’s a quicker way. I’m a programmer after all, my job is to automate things. However, I also didn’t want to spend too long on that, since I only had 40 stories, so the effort should definitely not be longer than it would have taken to manually export the remaining 35 stories.

I noticed that the HTML and JSON URLs for each story could actually be recreated by using the slug of the Story URL:

https://storify.com/LeaVerou/css-variables-var-subtitle-cssconf-asia.html
https://api.storify.com/v1/stories/LeaVerou/css-variables-var-subtitle-cssconf-asia

The bold part is the only thing that changes. I tried that with a different slug and it worked just fine. Bingo! So I could write a quick console script to get all these URLs and open them in separate tabs and then all I have to do is go through each tab and hit Cmd + S to save. It’s not perfect, but it took minutes to write and saved A LOT of time.

Following is the script I wrote. Go to your profile page, click “Show more” and scroll until all your stories are visible, then paste it into the console. You will probably need to do it twice: once to disable popup blocking because the browser rightfully freaks out when you try to open this many tabs from script, and once to actually open all of them.

var slugs = [... new Set($$(".story-tile").map(e => e.dataset.path))]
slugs.forEach(s => { open(`https://api.storify.com/v1/stories/${s}`); open(`https://storify.com/${s}.html`) })

This gets a list of all unique (hence the [...new Set(array)]) slugs and opens both the JSON and HTML export URLs in new tabs. Then you can go through each tab and save.

You will notice that the browser becomes REALLY SLOW when you open this many tabs (in my case 41 stories × 2 tabs each = 82 tabs!) so you may want to do it in steps, by using array.slice(). Also, if you don’t want to save the HTML version, the whole process becomes much faster, the HTML pages took AGES to load and kept freezing the browser.

Hope this helps!

PS: If you’re content with your data being held hostage by a different company, you could also use this tool by Wakelet. I’ve done that too, but I also wanted to own my data as well.

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Original

Free Intro to Web Development slides (with demos)

This semester I’m teaching 6.813 User Interface Design and Implementation at MIT, as an instructor.

Many of the assignments of this course include Web development and the course included two 2-hour labs to introduce students to these technologies. Since I’m involved this year, I decided to make new labs from scratch and increase the number of labs from 2 to 3. Even so, trying to decide what to include and what not to from the entirety of web development in only 6 hours was really hard, and I still feel I failed to include important bits.

Since many people asked me for the slides on Twitter, I decided to share them. You will find my slides here and an outline of what is covered is here. These slides were also the supporting material the students had on their own laptops and often they had to do exercises in them.

The audience for these slides is beginners in Web development but technical otherwise — people who understand OOP, trees, data structures and have experience in at least one C-like programming language.

Some demos will not make sense as they were live coded, but I included notes (top right or bottom left corner) about what was explained in each part.

Use the arrow keys to navigate. It is also quite big, so do not open this on a phone or on a data plan.

If the “Open in new Tab” button opens a tab which then closes immediately, disable Adblock.

From some quick testing, they seem to work in Firefox and Safari, but in class we were using an updated version of Chrome (since we were talking about developer tools, we needed to all have the same UI), so that’s the browser I’d recommend since they were tested much more there.

I’m sharing them as-is in case someone else finds them useful. Please do not bug me if they don’t work in your setup, or if you do not find them useful or whatever. If they don’t tickle your fancy, move on. I cannot provide any support or fixes. If you want to help fix the issue, you can submit a pull request, but be warned: most of the code was written under extreme time pressure (I had to produce this 6 times as fast as I usually need to make talks), so is not my finest moment.

If you want to use them to teach other people that’s fine as long as it’s a non-profit event.

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Original Tips

Different remote and local resource URLs, with Service Workers!

I often run into this issue where I want a different URL remotely and a different one locally so I can test my local changes to a library. Sure, relative URLs work a lot of the time, but are often not an option. Developing Mavo is yet another example of this: since Mavo is in a separate repo from mavo.io (its website) as well as test.mavo.io (the testsuite), I can’t just have relative URLs to it that also work remotely. I’ve been encountering this problem way too frequently pretty much since I started in web development. In this post, will describe all solutions and workarounds I’ve used over time for this, including the one I’m currently using for Mavo: Service Workers!

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Apps & scripts Original

Introducing Mavo: Create web apps entirely by writing HTML!

Today I finally released the project I’ve been working on for the last two years at MIT CSAIL: An HTML-based language for creating (many kinds of) web applications without programming or a server backend. It’s named Mavo after my late mother (Maria Verou), and is Open Source of course (yes, getting paid to work on open source is exactly as fun as it sounds).

It was the scariest release of my life, and have been postponing it for months. I kept feeling Mavo was not quite there yet, maybe I should add this one feature first, oh and this other one, oh and we can’t release without this one, surely! Eventually I realized that what I was doing had more to do with postponing the anxiety and less to do with Mavo reaching a stage where it can be released. After all, “if you’re not at least a bit embarrassed by what you release, you waited too long”, right?

The infamous Ship It Squrrel

So, there it is, I hope you find it useful. Read the post on Smashing Magazine or just head straight to mavo.io, read the docs, and play with the demos!

And do let me know what you make with it, no matter how small and trivial you may think it is, I would love to see it!

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Articles

HTML APIs: What they are and how to design a good one

I’m a strong believer in lowering the barrier of what it takes to create rich, interactive experiences and improving the user experience of programming. I wrote an article over at Smashing Magazine aimed at JavaScript library developers that want their libraries to be usable via HTML (i.e. without writing any JavaScript). Sounds interesting? Read it here.

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Apps & scripts

Duoload: Simplest website load comparison tool, ever

Today I needed a quick tool to compare the loading progression (not just loading time, but also incremental rendering) of two websites, one remote and one in my localhost. Just have them side by side and see how they load relative to each other. Maybe even record the result on video and study it afterwards. That’s all. No special features, no analysis, no stats.

So I did what I always do when I need help finding a tool, I asked Twitter:

Most suggested complicated tools, some non-free and most unlikely to work on local URLs. I thought damn, what I need is a very simple thing! I could code this in 5 minutes! So I did and here it is, in case someone else finds it useful! The (minuscule amount of) code is of course on Github.

Duoload

Of course it goes without saying that this is probably a bit inaccurate. Do not use it for mission-critical performance comparisons.

Credits for the name Duoload to Chris Lilley who came up with it in the 1 minute deadline I gave him 😛

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Original Tips

Resolve Promises externally with this one weird trick

Those of us who use promises heavily, have often wished there was a Promise.prototype.resolve() method, that would force an existing Promise to resolve. However, for architectural reasons (throw safety), there is no such thing and probably never will be. Therefore, a Promise can only resolve or reject by calling the respective methods in its constructor:

var promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
	if (something) {
		resolve();
	}
	else {
		reject();
	}
});

However, often it is not desirable to put your entire code inside a Promise constructor so you could resolve or reject it at any point. In my latest case today, I wanted a Promise that resolved when a tree was created, so that third-party components could defer code execution until the tree was ready. However, given that plugins could be running on any hook, that meant wrapping a ton of code with the Promise constructor, which was obviously a no-go. I had come across this problem before and usually gave up and created a Promise around all the necessary code. However, this time my aversion to what this would produce got me to think even harder. What could I do to call resolve() asynchronously from outside the Promise?

A custom event? Nah, too slow for my purposes, why involve the DOM when it’s not needed?

Another Promise? Nah, that just transfers the problem.

An setInterval to repeatedly check if the tree is created? OMG, I can’t believe you just thought that Lea, ewwww, gross!

Getters and setters? Hmmm, maybe that could work! If the setter is inside the Promise constructor, then I can resolve the Promise by just setting a property!

My first iteration looked like this:

this.treeBuilt = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
	Object.defineProperty(this, "_treeBuilt", {
		set: value => {
			if (value) {
				resolve();
			}
		}
	});
});

// Many, many lines below…

this._treeBuilt = true;

However, it really bothered me that I had to define 2 properties when I only needed one. I could of course do some cleanup and delete them after the promise is resolved, but the fact that at some point in time these useless properties existed will still haunt me, and I’m sure the more OCD-prone of you know exactly what I mean. Can I do it with just one property? Turns out I can!

The main idea is realizing that the getter and the setter could be doing completely unrelated tasks. In this case, setting the property would resolve the promise and reading its value would return the promise:

var setter;
var promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
	setter = value => {
		if (value) {
			resolve();
		}
	};
});

Object.defineProperty(this, "treeBuilt", {
	set: setter,
	get: () => promise
});

// Many, many lines below…

this.treeBuilt = true;

For better performance, once the promise is resolved you could even delete the dynamic property and replace it with a normal property that just points to the promise, but be careful because in that case, any future attempts to resolve the promise by setting the property will make you lose your reference to it!

I still think the code looks a bit ugly, so if you can think a more elegant solution, I’m all ears (well, eyes really)!

Update: Joseph Silber gave an interesting solution on twitter:

function defer() {
	var deferred = {
		promise: null,
		resolve: null,
		reject: null
	};

	deferred.promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
		deferred.resolve = resolve;
		deferred.reject = reject;
	});

	return deferred;
}

this.treeBuilt = defer();

// Many, many lines below…

this.treeBuilt.resolve();

I love that this is reusable, and calling resolve() makes a lot more sense than setting something to true. However, I didn’t like that it involved a separate object (deferred) and that people using the treeBuilt property would not be able to call .then() directly on it, so I simplified it a bit to only use one Promise object:

function defer() {
	var res, rej;

	var promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
		res = resolve;
		rej = reject;
	});

	promise.resolve = res;
	promise.reject = rej;

	return promise;
}

this.treeBuilt = defer();

// Many, many lines below…

this.treeBuilt.resolve();

Finally, something I like!

Categories
Original Tips

URL rewriting with Github Pages

redirectI adore Github Pages. I use them for everything I can, and try to avoid server-side code like the plague, exactly so that I can use them. The convenience of pushing to a repo and having the changes immediately reflected on the website with no commit hooks or any additional setup, is awesome. The free price tag is even more awesome. So, when the time came to publish my book, naturally, I wanted the companion website to be on Github Pages.

There was only one small problem: I wanted nice URLs, like http://play.csssecrets.io/pie-animated, which would redirect to demos on dabblet.com. Any sane person would have likely bitten the bullet and used some kind of server-side language. However, I’m not a particularly sane person 😀

Turns out Github uses some URL rewriting of its own on Github Pages: If you provide a 404.html, any URL that doesn’t exist will be handled by that. Wait a second, is that basically how we do nice URLs on the server anyway? We can do the same in Github Pages, by just running JS inside 404.html!

So, I created a JSON file with all demo ids and their dabblet URLs, a 404.html that shows either a redirection or an error (JS decides which one) and a tiny bit of Vanilla JS that reads the current URL, fetches the JSON file, and redirects to the right dabblet. Here it is, without the helpers:

(function(){

document.body.className = 'redirecting';

var slug = location.pathname.slice(1);

xhr({
	src: 'secrets.json',
	onsuccess: function () {
		var slugs = JSON.parse(this.responseText);
		
		var hash = slugs[slug];
		
		if (hash) {
			// Redirect
			var url = hash.indexOf('http') == 0? hash : 'http://dabblet.com/gist/' + hash;
			$('section.redirecting > p').innerHTML = 'Redirecting to <a href="' + url + '">' + url + '</a>…';
			location.href = url;
		}
		else {
			document.body.className = 'error not-found';
		}
	},
	onerror: function () {
		document.body.className = 'error json';
	}
});

})();

That’s all! You can imagine using the same trick to redirect to other HTML pages in the same Github Pages site, have proper URLs for a single page site, and all sorts of things! Is it a hack? Of course. But when did that ever stop us? 😀

Categories
Original Tips

Autoprefixing, with CSS variables!

Recently, when I was making the minisite for markapp.io, I realized a neat trick one can do with CSS variables, precisely due to their dynamic nature. Let’s say you want to use a property that has multiple versions: an unprefixed one and one or more prefixed ones. In this example we are going to use clip-path, which currently needs both an unprefixed version and a -webkit- prefixed one, however the technique works for any property and any number of prefixes or different property names, as long as the value is the same across all variations of the property name.

The first part is to define a --clip-path property on every element with a value of initial. This prevents the property from being inherited every time it’s used, and since the * has zero specificity, any declaration that uses --clip-path can override it. Then you define all variations of the property name with var(--clip-path) as their value:

* {
	--clip-path: initial;
	-webkit-clip-path: var(--clip-path);
	clip-path: var(--clip-path);
}

Then, every time we need clip-path, we use –clip-path instead and it just works:

header {
	--clip-path: polygon(0% 0%, 100% 0%, 100% calc(100% - 2.5em), 0% 100%);
}

Even !important should work, because it affects the cascading of CSS variables. Furthermore, if for some reason you want to explicitly set -webkit-clip-path, you can do that too, again because * has zero specificity. The main downside to this is that it limits browser support to the intersection of the support for the feature you are using and support for CSS Variables. However, all browsers except Edge support CSS variables, and Edge is working on it. I can’t see any other downsides to it (except having to use a different property name obvs), but if you do, let me know in the comments!

I think there’s still a lot to be discovered about cool uses of CSS variables. I wonder if there exists a variation of this technique to produce custom longhands, e.g. breaking box-shadow into --box-shadow-x, --box-shadow-y etc, but I can’t think of anything yet. Can you? 😉

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Original

Markapp: A list of HTML libraries

Screen Shot 2016-08-26 at 17.09.24I have often lamented how many JavaScript developers don’t realize that a large percentage of HTML & CSS authors are not comfortable writing JS, and struggle to use their libraries.

To encourage libraries with HTML APIs, i.e. libraries that can be used without writing a line of JS, I made a website to list and promote them: markapp.io. The list is currently quite short, so I’m counting on you to expand it. Seen any libraries with good HTML APIs? Add them!