Categories
Personal

Help me: take the color survey

If you are a creative professional, or just passionate about colors, please take my survey:

http://bit.ly/colorsurvey

It will greatly help me to make a future project of our company more usable (some of its features at least) and it only takes a few minutes (it contains 10-19 questions, depending on your responses).

Any suggestions, corrections, questions etc are of course welcome.

Thanks a lot in advance to everyone that takes the survey! πŸ˜€

Of course, when it ends and I find the time to analyze the results, I’ll post them here for anyone interested. (Hint: That means that if you are interested in the results, you can promote the survey yourself as well, since more responses = more accurate results)

Categories
Rants

Advocacy of JavaScript

I frequently meet these “hardcore” developers that deep (or not so deep) inside them, tend to underestimate JavaScript developers and boast about their own superiority. I’m sure that if you spent an important percentage of your career working with JavaScript and are even barely social, you definitely know what I’m talking about. It’s those desktop application programmers or these back-end developers that tend to consider JavaScript a toy, and try to convince you to engage in “more serious stuff” (if they appreciate you even a little; if they don’t they just mock you endlessly and/or look down on you).

Funnily enough, when most of these people are required to write JavaScript for some reason, one of the following happens:

  1. They write 2000-style code, which is usually the reason that most of them underestimate JavaScript so much: They think that everybody codes in JavaScript like themselves.
  2. They desperately look for “a good library” because “it’s not worth wasting my time to learn that stuff”.
  3. They actually learn the darn language and the relevant browser quirks and change their attitude towards JavaScript developers.

Douglas Crockford did it much better than me, but I would like to take my turn in arguing against their most frequent claims, if I may.

Categories
Tips

Extend Math.log to allow for bases != e

As Math.log currently stands, it’s a bit useless. It only calculates natural logarithms (base e).Β  We can easily modify it however, to calculate logarithms of any base:

Math.log = (function() {
	var log = Math.log;
	return function(n, a) {
		return log(n)/(a? log(a) : 1);
	}
})();

We can now specify the base as a second parameter, or still use the default one (Math.E) if we don’t specify one, so older scripts won’t break or if we want a shortcut to the natural logarithm. πŸ˜‰

Categories
Rants

100% Cyan in CMYK is NOT rgb(0,255,255)!!

As I mentioned in an earlier post of mine, I have to create a color picker, so I’ve already started to write the code for the Color class it’s going to use. I need it to natively support RGB, HSL, Lab and CMYK. And the latter part is causing unexpected trouble.

It seems that there is the notion out there that conversion from CMYK to RGB is easy. Newsflash: It’s not. As every graphic designer knows, the CMYK color gamut is smaller than the the RGB color gamut (even the sRGB color gamut). You can’t take a CMYK color and convert it to an out-of-CMYK-gamut RGB color! That’s nonsense! And it’s precisely what most conversion algorithms and color pickers out there do! Even Adobe Kuler!!!

Categories
Original

Cross browser, imageless linear gradients

I have to write a color picker in the near future and I wanted it to have those little gradients on top of the sliders that show you the effect that a slider change will have on the selected color. Consequently, I needed to create imageless gradients, in order to easily change them. My very first thought was creating many div or span elements in order to show the gradient. I rejected it almost instantly, for ovbious reasons (*cough* performance *cough*). My second thought was SVG for the proper browsers, and gradient filters for IE. As it turned out, inline SVG was too much of a hassle and I didn’t want to use Data URIs. My final thought was canvas for the proper browsers and gradient filters for IE.

Since I consider such a script very entertaining, I didn’t google it at all, I started coding right away. Time to have fun! πŸ˜€ After finishing it though, I googled it just out of curiosity and didn’t like the other solutions much (either the solution itself, or the code), so I decided to post it in case it helps someone. I also made a little test page, so that you may test out how it works. πŸ™‚

Categories
Original Tips

Mockup viewer bookmarklet

I usually view mockups in a browser, so that the impression I get is as close as possible to reality (I learned this the hard way: A mockup that seemed great in the neutral and minimalistic environment of a picture viewer, ended up looking way too fancy when viewed in a browser, something that I realized after having worked for 6 months on the site). If you do the same, I’m sure you’ll feel my pain: Every time I do that, I have to carefully scroll down just as much as to hide the margin that the browser adds, and left just as much as to center the image. Not to mention the click required to enlarge the image to full-size.

Not any more!

Categories
News Personal

CSS3 colors, today (MediaCampAthens session)

Yesterday, I had a session at MediaCampAthens (a BarCamp-style event), regarding CSS3 colors. If you’ve followed my earlier posts tagged with “colors”, my presentation was mostly a sum-up of these.

It was my first presentation ever, actually, the first time I talked to an audience for more than 1 minute πŸ˜› . This caused some goofs:

  • When introducing myself, I said completely different things than I intended to and ended up sounding like an arrogant moron πŸ˜›
  • I tried not to look at the audience too much, in order to avoid sounding nervous, and this caused me to completely ignore 2 questions (as I found out afterwards)! How embarrasing!
  • At a certain point, I said “URL” instead of “domain” πŸ˜›

Also, I had prepared some screenshots (you’ll see them in the ppt) and the projector completely screwed them up, as it showed any dark color as black.

Apart from those, I think it went very well, I received lots of positive feedback about it and the audience was paying attention, so I guess they found it interesting (something that I didn’t expect πŸ˜› ).

Here is the presentation:

Please note that Slideshare messed up slide #8 and the background seems semi-transparent grey instead of semi-transparent white.

By the way, I also thought afterwards that I had made a mistake: -ms-filter is not required if we combine the gradient filter with Data URIs, since IE8 supports Data URIs (for images at least). Oops, I hate making mistakes that I can’t correct.

Here are some photos from my session. If I did it correctly, every facebook user can see them. If I messed things up, tell me πŸ˜›

Categories
Thoughts

CMYK colors in CSS: Useful or useless?

As someone who dealed a bit with print design in the past, I consider CMYK colors the easiest color system for humen to understand and manipulate. It’s very similar to what we used as children, when mixing watercolors for our drawings. It makes perfect sense, more than HSL and definately more than RGB. I understand that most of us are so accustomed to using RGB that can’t realise that, but try to think for a moment: Which color system would make more sense to you if you had no idea and no experience at all with any of them?

Categories
Articles News

On native, single-input, multiple file uploads

If you are following the current news on web development, you probably heard that the new Safari 4 has a great feature: It natively allows the user to select multiple files via a single input control, if you specify a value for the attribute multiple:

<input type="file" multiple>

or, in XHTML:

<input type="file" multiple="multiple" />

You might not know that Opera supported multiple file uploads for a while now, based on the earlier Web Forms 2.0 standard in a slightly different (and more flexible) format:

<input type="file" min="1" max="9999β€³ />
Categories
Original Tips

Check whether the browser supports RGBA (and other CSS3 values)

When using CSS, we can just include both declarations, one using rgba, and one without it, as mentioned in my post on cross-browser RGBA backgrounds. When writing JavaScript however, it’s a waste of resources to do that (and requires more verbose code), since we can easily check whether the browser is RGBA-capable, almost as easily as we can check whether it suppports a given property. We can even follow the same technique to detect the support of other CSS3 values (for instance, multiple backgrounds support, HSLA support, etc).