Categories
Articles

Issue closing stats for any repo

tl;dr: If you just want to quickly get stats for a repo, you can find the app here. The rest of this post explains how it’s built with Mavo HTML, CSS, and 0 lines of JS. Or, if you’d prefer, you can just View Source — it’s all there!

The finished app we’re going to make, find it at https://leaverou.github.io/issue-closing

One of the cool things about Mavo is how it enables one to quickly build apps that utilize the Github API. At some point I wanted to compute stats about how quickly (or rather, slowly…) Github issues are closed in the Mavo repo. And what better way to build this than a Mavo app? It was fairly easy to build a prototype for that.

Categories
Original Tips

URL rewriting with Github Pages

redirectI adore Github Pages. I use them for everything I can, and try to avoid server-side code like the plague, exactly so that I can use them. The convenience of pushing to a repo and having the changes immediately reflected on the website with no commit hooks or any additional setup, is awesome. The free price tag is even more awesome. So, when the time came to publish my book, naturally, I wanted the companion website to be on Github Pages.

There was only one small problem: I wanted nice URLs, like http://play.csssecrets.io/pie-animated, which would redirect to demos on dabblet.com. Any sane person would have likely bitten the bullet and used some kind of server-side language. However, I’m not a particularly sane person 😀

Turns out Github uses some URL rewriting of its own on Github Pages: If you provide a 404.html, any URL that doesn’t exist will be handled by that. Wait a second, is that basically how we do nice URLs on the server anyway? We can do the same in Github Pages, by just running JS inside 404.html!

So, I created a JSON file with all demo ids and their dabblet URLs, a 404.html that shows either a redirection or an error (JS decides which one) and a tiny bit of Vanilla JS that reads the current URL, fetches the JSON file, and redirects to the right dabblet. Here it is, without the helpers:

(function(){

document.body.className = 'redirecting';

var slug = location.pathname.slice(1);

xhr({
	src: 'secrets.json',
	onsuccess: function () {
		var slugs = JSON.parse(this.responseText);
		
		var hash = slugs[slug];
		
		if (hash) {
			// Redirect
			var url = hash.indexOf('http') == 0? hash : 'http://dabblet.com/gist/' + hash;
			$('section.redirecting > p').innerHTML = 'Redirecting to <a href="' + url + '">' + url + '</a>…';
			location.href = url;
		}
		else {
			document.body.className = 'error not-found';
		}
	},
	onerror: function () {
		document.body.className = 'error json';
	}
});

})();

That’s all! You can imagine using the same trick to redirect to other HTML pages in the same Github Pages site, have proper URLs for a single page site, and all sorts of things! Is it a hack? Of course. But when did that ever stop us? 😀

Categories
Tips

Easily keep gh-pages in sync with master

I always loved Github’s ability to publish pages for a project and get the strain out of your server. However, every time I tried it, I struggled to keep the gh-pages branch up to date. Until I discovered the awesome git rebase.

Usually my github workflow is like this:

git add .
git status // to see what changes are going to be commited
git commit -m 'Some descriptive commit message'
git push origin master

Now, when I use gh-pages, there are only a few more commands that I have to use after the above:

git checkout gh-pages // go to the gh-pages branch
git rebase master // bring gh-pages up to date with master
git push origin gh-pages // commit the changes
git checkout master // return to the master branch

I know this is old news to some of you (I’m a github n00b, struggling with basic stuff, so my advice is probably for other n00bs), but if I had read this a few months ago, it would’ve saved me big hassles, so I’m writing it for the others out there that are like me a few months ago.

Now if only I find an easy way to automate this… 🙂