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Original

iOS 6 switch style checkboxes with pure CSS

I recently found myself looking at the Tools switch in Espresso:

Not because I was going to use it (I rarely do), but because I started wondering what would be the best way to replicate this effect in CSS. I set on to create something that adhered to the following rules:

  1. It should be keyboard accessible
  2. It should work in as many browsers as possible and degrade gracefully to a plain checkbox in the rest
  3. It shouldn’t depend on pseudo-elements in replaced elements (such as checkboxes), since that’s non-standard so not very dependable
  4. It shouldn’t require any extra HTML elements
  5. It shouldn’t use JS, unless perhaps to generate HTML that could be written by hand if the author wishes to do so.

Why you may ask? Some of them are good practices in general, and the rest make it easier to reuse the component (and they made it more challenging too!).

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Articles Tips

Tip: Multi-step form handling

First of all, sorry for my long absence! I haven’t abandoned this blog, I was just really, really busy. I’m still busy, and this probably won’t change soon. However, I will still blog when I get too fed up with work or studying (this is one of these moments…). Now, let’s get to the meat.

The situation

In most web applications, even the simplest ones, the need for form handling will arise. There will be forms that need to be submitted, checked, processed or returned to the user informing them about any errors. A good empirical rule I try to follow is “Try not to produce URLs that don’t have a meaning if accessed directly”. It sounds simple and common-sense, doesn’t it? However, as Francois Voltaire said, “common sense is not so common”. I’ve seen variations of the following scenario several times, in several websites or even commercial web application software:

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Articles

Creating the perfect slider

I’ve previously discussed many times the color picker I have to create, and blogged about my findings on the way. An essential component of most color pickers is a slider control.

I won’t go through much techincal details or JavaScript code in this article (after all the usability guidelines presented don’t only apply to JavaScript applications, and this is why I used Adobe Kuler as a good or bad example for some of them), it’s been done numerous times before and I prefer being a bit original than duplicating web content. You can google it and various implementations will come up if you need a starting point.

Some might argue that I suffer from NIH syndrome, but I prefer to code things my way when I think I can do something even a bit better. After all, if nobody ever tries to reinvent the wheel, the wheel stands no chances of improvement. In this case, I wanted to build the most usable slider ever (at least for color picking uses), or -from an arguably more conservative point of view- something significantly more usable than the rest (if you think about it, the two statements are equivalent, the first one just sounds more arrogant 😛 ).