Categories
Original Tips

Dynamically generated SVG through SASS + A 3D animated RGB cube!

Screenshot of the cubeToday, I was giving the opening keynote at Codemania in Auckland, New Zealand. It was a talk about color from a math/dev perspective. It went quite well, despite my complete lack of sleep. I mean that quite literally: I hadn’t slept all night. No, it wasn’t the jetlag or the nervousness that kept me up. It was my late minute decision to replace the static, low-res image of an RGB cube I was using until then with a 3D cube generated with CSS and animated with CSS animations. Next thing I knew, it was light outside and I had to start getting ready. However, I don’t regret literally losing sleep to make a slide that is only shown for 20 seconds at most. Not only it was super fun to develop, but also yielded a few things that I thought were interesting enough to blog about.

The most challenging part wasn’t actually the 3D cube. This has been done tons of times before, it was probably the most common demo for CSS 3D transforms a couple of years ago. The only part of this that could be of interest is that mine only used 2 elements for the cube. This is a dabblet of the cube, without any RGB gradients on it:

The challenging part was creating the gradients for the 6 sides. These are not plain gradients, as you can see below:

RGB cube sidesThese are basically two linear gradients from left to right, with the topmost one being masked with a gradient from top to bottom. You can use CSS Masking to achieve this (for Chrome/Safari) and SVG Masks for Firefox, but this masks the whole element, which would hide the pseudo-elements needed for the sides. What I needed was masks applied to backgrounds only, not the whole element.

It seemed obvious that the best idea would be to use SVG background images. For example, here is the SVG background needed for the top left one:

<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" width="200px" height="200px">

<linearGradient id="yellow-white" x1="0" x2="0" y1="0" y2="1">
	<stop stop-color="yellow" />
	<stop offset="1" stop-color="white" />
</linearGradient>
<linearGradient id="magenta-red" x1="0" x2="0" y1="0" y2="1">
	<stop stop-color="red" />
	<stop offset="1" stop-color="magenta" />
</linearGradient>
<linearGradient id="gradient" x1="0" x2="1" y1="0" y2="0">
	<stop stop-color="white" />
	<stop offset="1" stop-color="black" />
</linearGradient>
<mask id="gradient-mask">
	<rect width="100%" height="100%" fill="url(#gradient)"/>
</mask>

<rect width="100%" height="100%" fill="url(#yellow-white)"/>
<rect width="100%" height="100%" fill="url(#magenta-red)" mask="url(#gradient-mask)"/>

</svg>

However, I didn’t want to have 6 separate SVG files, especially with this kind of repetition (cross-linking to reuse gradients and masks across different files is still fairly buggy in certain browsers). I wanted to be able to edit this straight from my CSS. And then it hit me: I was using SASS already. I could code SASS functions that generate SVG data URIs!

Here’s the set of SVG generating SASS functions I ended up writing:

@function inline-svg($content, $width: $side, $height: $side) {
	@return url('data:image/svg+xml,#{$content}');
}

@function svg-rect($fill, $width: '100%', $height: $width, $x: '0', $y: '0') {
	@return unquote('');
}

@function svg-gradient($id, $color1, $color2, $x1: 0, $x2: 0, $y1: 0, $y2: 1) {
	@return unquote('

	');
}

@function svg-mask($id, $content) {
	@return unquote('#{$content}');
}

And then I was able to generate each RGB plane with another function that made use of them:

@function rgb-plane($c1, $c2, $c3, $c4) {
	@return inline-svg(
		svg-gradient('top', $c1, $c2) +
		svg-gradient('bottom', $c3, $c4) +
		svg-gradient('gradient', white, black, 0, 1, 0, 0) +
		svg-mask('gradient-mask', svg-rect('url(%23gradient)')) +
		svg-rect('url(%23bottom)') +
		svg-rect('url(%23top)" mask="url(%23gradient-mask)')
	);
}

/* ... */

.cube {
	background: rgb-plane(blue, black, aqua, lime);

	&::before {
		background: rgb-plane(blue, fuchsia, aqua, white);
	}

	&::after {
		background: rgb-plane(fuchsia, red, blue, black);
	}
}

.cube .sides {
	background: rgb-plane(yellow, lime, red, black);

	&::before {
		background: rgb-plane(yellow, white, red, fuchsia);
	}

	&::after {
		background: rgb-plane(white, aqua, yellow, lime);
	}
}

However, the same functions can be used for all sorts of SVG backgrounds and it’s very easy to add a new one. E.g. to make polygons:

@function svg-polygon($fill, $points) {
	@return unquote('');
}

@function svg-circle($fill, $r: '50%', $cx: '50%', $cy: '50%') {
	@return unquote('');
}

You can see the whole SCSS file here and its CSS output here.

Warning: Keep in mind that IE9 and some older versions of other browsers have issues with unencoded SVG data URIs. Also, you still need to escape hashes (%23 instead of #), otherwise Firefox fails.

Categories
Tips

Slanted tabs with CSS 3D transforms

Not sure if I’m the first to come up with this idea, but I searched and didn’t find anything. So, for a long time, I was wondering if there’s an easy way to create trapezoid shapes in CSS, especially with borders etc. Eventually, I realized that I could use a pseudo-element for the background and 3D rotate it, so that it appears like a trapezoid. Then @krofdrakula suggested on twitter that I could even add border-radius so that it looks like a tab, so I added that as well:

Eventually I thought, why not actually turn this into a tab demo? So I made a dabblet with that. And then I realized that if you change the transform-origin, other interesting tab shapes appear! Enjoy:

The best part? It degrades pretty gracefully on browsers that don’t support transforms! You get nice rounded tabs that just aren’t slanted (although they have a pretty large top padding, but you can use Modernizr for that. Try it for yourself by commenting the transform out in the dabblet and see the result.

Another issue is that the angled lines look a bit aliased in Firefox, but that’s a bug that will eventually get fixed.

In general, it’s a bit rough around the edges, so treat it more as a proof of concept. But with a little more work, it could totally work in production. Tested in Chrome, Safari, Firefox, IE9 (fallback) and IE10.

Categories
News

Can we get rid of gradient prefixes?

I recently realized that unprefixed gradients finally propagated to stable Chrome, and after tweeting about it, I decided to do some research on which browsers support unprefixed gradients, and what percentage of users needs them.

Currently, unprefixed gradients are supported in:

  • Chrome 26+
  • Firefox 16+
  • Opera 12.10+
  • IE10+

Lets have a look at which prefixes we actually need to use for gradients today.

-ms-

There was never a stable release of IE that supported -ms- prefixed gradients, those were only in preview versions (stable IE10 supports both prefixed and unprefixed gradients). So, -ms- is most definitely not required.

-moz-

Firefox versions >= 3.6 and < 16 account for 4% of the global user base*. This might or might not be significant, depending on how good the fallback is that these users will see. If the gradient only adds a subtle shadow or something like that, I’d say ditch -moz-. If it’s more crucial to the design & branding, it might be wise to still keep it. More tech-focused websites probably have a much lower percentage than 4%, so it might be a good idea to drop it there completely.

-o-

Opera unprefixed gradients in 12.10. Opera Mini never supported them. Opera versions < 12.10 currently account to a total of 0.25% of the global user base*. I’d say it’s safe to ditch -o- in gradients in most cases.

-webkit-

Chrome only very recently unprefixed gradients and Safari is a long way from doing so. Not to mention all the mobile browsers using WebKit. Unfortunately, we can’t ditch -webkit- in CSS gradients just yet.

My opinion

Don’t use -ms- prefixed gradients, there’s absolutely zero point in doing so. Include -moz- for the less subtle gradients. No significant need for -o- gradients. -webkit- is still needed and probably will be at least until the end of 2013. Or, of course, just use -prefix-free and don’t bother. 😛

Keep in mind that your stats might differ from global stats, so which prefixes you need to include might differ on a case by case basis. The purpose of this post is to alert you that maybe you don’t need all these prefixes, not to prescriptively tell you which ones to keep. Except -ms-, please don’t use that. There’s absolutely zero reason whatsoever.

Last but not least, no matter which prefixes you include, always have a good solid color fallback!

 

* Global market share statistics from StatCounter, for a 3 month period of January 2013 – March 2013. The graph on the website only displays the most popular browser versions, but downloading the CSV file gives you all of them.

Categories
Tips

CSS Animations with only one keyframe

This is a very quick tip, about a pet peeve of mine in almost every CSS animation I see. As you may know, I’m a sucker for reducing the amount of code (as long as it remains human readable of course). I demonstrated a very similar example in my “CSS in the 4th dimension” talk, but I recently realized I never blogged about it (or seen anyone else do so).

Lets assume you have a simple animation of a pounding heart, like so:

Categories
Tips

Pure CSS scrolling shadows with background-attachment: local

A few days ago, the incredibly talented Roman Komarov posted an experiment of his with pure CSS “scrolling shadows”. If you’re using Google Reader, you are probably familiar with the effect:

Screenshot demonstrating the “scrolling shadows” in Google Reader

In Roman’s experiment, he is using absolutely positioned pseudoelements to cover the shadows (which are basically radial gradients as background images), taking advantage of the fact that when you scroll a scrollable container, its background does not scroll with it, but absolutely positioned elements within do. Therefore, when you scroll, the shadows are no longer obscured and can show through. Furthermore, these pseudoelements are linear gradients from white to transparent, so that these shadows are uncovered smoothly.

When I saw Roman’s demo, I started wondering whether this is possible with no extra containers at all (pseudoelements included). It seemed like a perfect use case for background-attachment: local. Actually, it was the first real use case for it I had ever came up with or seen.

Categories
Tips

Moving an element along a circle

It all started a few months ago, when Chris Coyier casually asked me how would I move an element along a circle, without of course rotating the element itself. If I recall correctly, his solution was to use multiple keyframes, for various points on a circle’s circumference, approximating it. I couldn’t think of anything better at the time, but the question was stuck in the back of my head.

Categories
Tips

Simpler CSS typing animation, with the ch unit

A while ago, I posted about how to use steps() as an easing function to create a typing animation that degrades gracefully.

Today I decided to simplify it a bit and make it more flexible, at the cost of browser support. The new version fully works in Firefox 1+ and IE10, since Opera and WebKit don’t support the ch unit and even though IE9 supports it, it doesn’t support CSS animations.

Categories
Apps & scripts Original

Exactly how much CSS3 does your browser support?

This project started as an attempt to improve dabblet and to generate data for the book chapter I’m writing for Smashing Book #3. I wanted to create a very simple/basic testsuite for CSS3 stuff so that you could hover on a e.g. CSS3 property and you got a nice browser support popup. While I didn’t achieve that (turns out BrowserScope doesn’t do that kind of thing), I still think it’s interesting as a spin-off project, especially since the results will probably surprise you.

How it works

css3test (very superficially) tests pretty much everything in the specs mentioned on the sidebar (not just the popular widely implemented stuff). You can click on every feature to expand it and see the exact the testcases run and whether they passed. It only checks what syntax the browser recognizes, which doesn’t necessarily mean it will work correctly when used. WebKit is especially notorious for cheating in tests like this, recognizing stuff it doesn’t understand, like the values “round” and “space” for background-repeat, but the cheating isn’t big enough to seriously compromise the test.

Whether a feature is supported with a prefix or not doesn’t matter for the result. If it’s supported without a prefix, it will test that one. If it’s supported only with a prefix, it will test the prefixed one. For properties especially, if an unprefixed one is supported, it will be used in all the tests.

Only stuff that’s in a W3C specification is tested. So, please don’t ask or send pull requests for proprietary things like -webkit-gradient() or -webkit-background-clip: text; or -webkit-box-reflect and so on.

Every feature contributes the same to the end score, as well as to the score of the individual spec, regardless of the number of tests it has.

Crazy shit

Chrome may display slightly different scores (1% difference) across pageloads. It seems that for some reason, it fails the tests for border-image completely on some pageloads, which doesn’t make any sense. Whoever wants to investigate, I’d be grateful.
Edit: Fixed (someone found and submitted an even crazier workaround.).

Browserscope

This is the first project of mine in which I’ve used browserscope. This means that your results will be sent over to its servers and aggreggated. When I have enough data, I’m gonna built a nice table for everyone to see 🙂 In the meantime, check the results page.

It doesn’t work on my browser, U SUCK!

The test won’t work on dinosaur browsers like IE8, but who cares measuring their CSS3 support anyway? “For a laugh” isn’t a good enough answer to warrant the time needed.

If you find a bug, please remember you didn’t pay a dime for this before nagging. Politely report it on Github, or even better, fix it and send a pull request.

Why did you build it?

To motivate browsers to support the less hyped stuff, because I’m tired of seeing the same things being evangelized over and over. There’s much more to CSS3.

Current results

At the time of this writing, these are the results for the major modern browsers:

  • Chrome Canary, WebKit nightlies, Firefox Nightly: 64%
  • Chrome, IE10PP4: 63%
  • Firefox 10: 61%
  • Safari 5.1, iOS5 Safari: 60%
  • Opera 11.60: 56%
  • Firefox 9: 58%
  • Firefox 6-8: 57%
  • Firefox 5, Opera 11.1 – 11.5: 55%
  • Safari 5.0: 54%
  • Firefox 4: 49%
  • Safari 4: 47%
  • Opera 10: 45%
  • Firefox 3.6: 44%
  • IE9: 39%

Enjoy! css3test.com Fork css3test on Github Browserscope results

Categories
Apps & scripts Original

Introducing dabblet: An interactive CSS playground

I loved JSFiddle ever since I first used it. Being able to test something almost instantly and without littering my hard drive opened new possibilities for me. I use it daily for experiments, browser bug testcases, code snippet storage, code sharing and many other things. However, there were always a few things that bugged me:

  • JSFiddle is very JS oriented, as you can tell even from the name itself
  • JSFiddle is heavily server-side so there’s always at least the lag of an HTTP request every time you make an action. It makes sense not to run JS on every keystroke (JSBin does it and it’s super annoying, even caused me to fall in an infinite loop once) but CSS and HTML could be updated without any such problems.
  • I’m a huge tabs fan, I hate spaces for indenting with a passion.
  • Every time I want to test a considerable amount of CSS3, I need to include -prefix-free as a resource and I can’t save that preference or any other (like “No library”).
Don’t get me wrong, I LOVE JSFiddle. It was a pioneer and it paved the way for all similar apps. It’s great for JavaScript experiments. But for pure CSS/HTML experiments, we can do better.
The thought of making some interactive playground for CSS experiments was lingering in my mind for quite a while, but never attempted to start it as I knew it would be a lot of fascinating work and I wouldn’t be able to focus on anything else throughout. While I was writing my 24ways article, I wanted to include lots of CSS demos and I wanted the code to be editable and in some cases on top of the result to save space. JSFiddle’s embedding didn’t do that, so I decided to make something simple, just for that article. It quickly evolved to something much bigger, and yes I was right, it was lots of fascinating work and I wasn’t able to focus on anything else throughout. I even delayed my 24ways article for the whole time I was developing it, and I’m grateful that Drew was so patient. After 3 weeks of working on it, I present dabblet.
Categories
Apps & scripts Original

Animatable: A CSS transitions gallery

What kind of transitions can you create with only one property? This is what my new experiment, animatable aims to explore.

It’s essentially a gallery of basic transitions. It aims to show how different animatable properties look when they transition and to broaden our horizons about which properties can be animated. Hover over the demos to see the animation in action, or click “Animate All” to see all of them (warning: might induce nausea, headache and seizures 😛 ). You can also click on it to see more details and get a permalink. Instead of clicking, you can also navigate with the arrow keys and press Esc to return to the main listing.

Fork it on Github and add your own ideas. Be sure to add your twitter username to them as a data-author attribute!

I’ve only tested in Firefox and Chrome for OSX so far. Not sure which other browsers are supported. However, since it uses CSS animations, we know for sure that it won’t work in browsers that don’t support CSS animations.

Hope you enjoy it 🙂