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Original Tips

Custom <select> drop downs with CSS3

The CSS3 Basic UI module defines pointer-events as:

The pointer-events property allows authors to control whether or when an element may be the target of user pointing device (pointer, e.g. mouse) events. This property is used to specify under which circumstance (if any) a pointer event should go “through” an element and target whatever is “underneath” that element instead. This also applies to other “hit testing” behaviors such as dynamic pseudo-classes (:hover, :active, :focus), hyperlinks, and Document.elementFromPoint().

The property was originally SVG-only, but eventually browsers and the W3C adopted a more limited version for HTML elements too.

It can be used in many use cases that weren’t possible before (or the solution was overly complicated), one of them being to create custom-looking <select> drop downs, by overlaying an element over the native drop down arrow (to create the custom one) and disallowing pointer events on it. Here’s a quick example:

-webkit-appearance: none was needed in Webkit to turn off the native OSX appearance (in OSX and maybe Safari on Windows, I didn’t test that). However, since that also removes the native drop down arrow, our custom arrow now obscures part of the text, so we had to add a 30px padding-right to the select element, only in Webkit.

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Articles

The curious case of border-radius:50%

Admittedly, percentages in border-radius are not one of the most common use cases. Some even consider them an edge case, since most people seem to set border-radius in pixels or –rarely– ems. And since it’s not used very frequently, it’s still quite buggy. A bit of a chicken and egg case actually: Is it buggy because it’s used rarely or is it used rarely because it’s buggy? My vote would go to the first, so the purpose of this post is to let people know about why percentages in border-radius are incredibly useful and to highlight the various browser whims when it comes to rendering them.

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Apps & scripts Replies

A CSS3 learning(?) tool

In case anyone is interested, this is my take on the “challenge” that Brad Neuberg posted today on Ajaxian. It needs more properties, but it’s very easy to extend. I guess I should also add CSS3 values (RGBA/HSL(A) colors, CSS gradients etc) but oh well, I’m currently in a hurry. I will, if anyone actually finds it useful (?).

It didn’t prove much of a challenge actually and I honestly doubt it’s educational value (actually it’s value in general), but it was an interesting thing to do while drinking my first coffee in the morning — I really enjoyed writing it 🙂

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Articles

Exploring CSS3 text-shadow

I consider CSS3’s text-shadow one of the most exciting CSS3* properties, which offers us a lot more effects than it’s name suggests. Of course, it can be used for creating drop shadows for text, and it carries out that task very well, but it’s inherent flexibility allows it to be also used for glow effects, outlines, bevels, extruded text, inset text, fuzzy text and many others (until browser bugs and backwards compatibility come into play… :(). This post is about various findings of mine (and others’, where a source is provided) regarding this property, including browser bugs and inconsistencies, effects that can be achieved with it, compatibility woes etc.

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Original Tips

Bevels in CSS3

Yeah, yeah I know, bevels are soooo 1996. And I agree. However, it’s always good to know the capabilities of your tools. Talented designers will know when it’s suitable to use a certain effect and incapable ones will abuse whatever is given to them, so after a lot of thought, I decided to blog about my discovery.

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Articles

CSS3 border-radius, today

This is the first one from a series of articles I’m going to write about using CSS3 properties or values today. I’ll cover everything I have found out while using them, including various browser quirks and bugs I know of or have personally filed regarding them. In this part I’ll discuss ways to create rounded corners without images and if possible without JavaScript in the most cross-browser fashion.